The mobility as a service model is expected to be the primary future means of deploying automated vehicles

A new Leaderboard Report from examines the strategy and execution of 19 companies developing automated driving systems, with GM, Waymo, and Daimler-Bosch leading the pack.

Progress continues in the automated driving sector as more companies shift from R&D to production engineering. Looking to combat issues such as distracted driving, as well as address threats to traditional business models, leading manufacturers are leveraging new partnerships and acquisitions to help them scale more rapidly. : According to a new Leaderboard report from , GM, Waymo, Daimler-Bosch, Ford, Volkswagen Group, BMW-Intel-FCA, Aptiv, and Reneault-Nissan Alliance are the leading companies developing automated driving systems.

“For the past several years, there has been a lot of discussion about whether the technology or automotive industries will come out on top in the effort to develop and deploy automated vehicles,” says Sam Abuelsamid, senior research analyst at Navigant Research. “Increasingly, both groups have come to the conclusion that the answer is and rather than or as they partner up to leverage each other’s strengths to build robust, scalable solutions.”

As the pace of development in the automated driving sector continues to accelerate, the number of automated ride-hailing pilot programs has also increased. According to the report, mobility as a service will be the primary means of deploying automated vehicles, particularly in the early years of commercialization.

The report, , evaluates 19 companies developing automated driving systems. These players are rated on 10 criteria: vision; go-to market strategy; partners; production strategy; technology; sales, marketing, and distribution; product capability; product quality and reliability; product portfolio; and staying power. Using Navigant Research’s proprietary Leaderboard methodology, vendors are profiled, rated, and ranked with the goal of providing an objective assessment of their relative strengths and weaknesses in the development and deployment of automated driving technology. An Executive Summary of the report is available for free download on the .

Contact: Lindsay Funicello-Paul

+1.781.270.8456

* The information contained in this press release concerning the report, Navigant Research Leaderboard: Automated Driving Vehicles, is a summary and reflects Navigant Research’s current expectations based on market data and trend analysis. Market predictions and expectations are inherently uncertain and actual results may differ materially from those contained in this press release or the report. Please refer to the full report for a complete understanding of the assumptions underlying the report’s conclusions and the methodologies used to create the report. Neither Navigant Research nor Navigant undertakes any obligation to update any of the information contained in this press release or the report.

Read more: GM, Waymo, and Daimler-Bosch Are the Top 3...

Mobility as a service technologies, along with wireless communications and automated scheduling, can alleviate last-mile logistics challenges of parking and congestion

A new report from looks at the future of last-mile logistics (LML) and mobility as a service (MaaS), examining how the concepts might work together to create efficiencies and cost savings.

MaaS, which provides mobility on demand at a lower cost per mile than owning a vehicle, could offer new options and delivery costs savings for LML, or the local delivery of food and small packages, as well as larger items such as consumer appliances. Integrated, shared fleets, as well as automated driving vehicles are critical for the success of these service models in the long term, while drones have the potential to become a cost-effective solution for deliveries to remote locations. : According to a new report from , combining MaaS and LML could mean that operating single-purpose vehicles for delivery will no longer be necessary for many businesses.

“Congestion and parking in large cities continues to be the biggest challenges for LML,” says Sam Abuelsamid, senior research analyst at Navigant Research. “MaaS technologies, along with wireless communications and automated scheduling, can alleviate these issues while providing additional benefits to citizens and businesses.”

In the near future, a MaaS model for a city or local region could mean deploying a fleet of automated vehicles designed to move large numbers of people to work during rush hour and then deliver on-demand transport during off-peak hours. According to the report, this type of fleet would have excess capacity available outside peak hours to perform functions like small parcel and takeout food delivery.

The report, , explores the future of LML and examines how it might work together with MaaS. The study provides an analysis of the main components that enable LML services, such as shared mobility fleets, automated vehicle fleets, drones, and endpoint delivery systems. It also examines the key market players in the LML space, as well as the potential dramatic changes in vehicle manufacturing due to the new LML service models. An Executive Summary of the report is available for free download on the .

Contact: Lindsay Funicello-Paul

+1.781.270.8456

* The information contained in this press release concerning the report, The Future of Last-Mile Logistics, is a summary and reflects Navigant Research’s current expectations based on market data and trend analysis. Market predictions and expectations are inherently uncertain and actual results may differ materially from those contained in this press release or the report. Please refer to the full report for a complete understanding of the assumptions underlying the report’s conclusions and the methodologies used to create the report. Neither Navigant Research nor Navigant undertakes any obligation to update any of the information contained in this press release or the report.

Read more: Combining Last-Mile Logistics and Mobility as a...

Transportation network companies should focus on driving costs out of their platforms to reach sustainable profitability

A new report from examines the global market for mobility as a service (MaaS) solutions, including carsharing, ride-hailing, micro transit, automated mobility, and peer-to-peer (P2P) rental services.

As more people move from rural areas to cities, an influx of personally owned vehicles is contributing to issues such as congestion, air quality, and traffic accidents. MaaS solutions can provide more flexibility than mass transit while also enabling the replacement of individually owned vehicles. : According to a new report from , global revenue generated by ride-hailing services is expected to grow to almost $1.2 trillion in 2026.

“During the next decade, ride-hailing provided by human drivers will lead services in the MaaS field, enabled by platform providers like Uber, Lyft, Didi, and Ola,” says Sam Abuelsamid, senior research analyst with Navigant Research. “The convenience of summoning a vehicle through an app and paying electronically makes this service appealing and gives it a distinct advantage over carsharing.”

However, while global ride-hailing services revenue will be enormous, transportation network companies (TNCs) must drive a lot of cost out of their platforms to reach sustainable profitability, something none have done so far. According to the report, as automated driving supplants human drivers, existing TNCs will find themselves challenged by services provided directly by the companies that manufacture vehicles. There is still significant room for growth before the MaaS market is saturated, but low switching costs for riders are expected to make it a challenging business.

The report, , examines the global market for MaaS solutions such as carsharing, ride-hailing, micro transit, automated mobility, and peer-to-peer (P2P) rental services. The study provides an analysis of the market issues, including drivers, challenges, and business and operational models, associated with MaaS. Global market forecasts, segmented by service and region, extend through 2026. The report also examines the key technology issues related to MaaS, as well as the competitive landscape. An Executive Summary of the report is available for free download on the .

Contact: Lindsay Funicello-Paul

+1.781.270.8456

* The information contained in this press release concerning the report, Mobility as a Service, is a summary and reflects Navigant Research’s current expectations based on market data and trend analysis. Market predictions and expectations are inherently uncertain and actual results may differ materially from those contained in this press release or the report. Please refer to the full report for a complete understanding of the assumptions underlying the report’s conclusions and the methodologies used to create the report. Neither Navigant Research nor Navigant undertakes any obligation to update any of the information contained in this press release or the report.

Read more: Global Revenue Generated by Ride-Hailing...

New powertrain production strategies are expected to enable countries to work toward meeting new policies and regulations designed to limit emissions and boost fuel economy

A new report from examines the global market for low voltage electrification opportunities and challenges, providing global market forecasts for vehicle sales and the value of key components, segmented by global region, through 2026.

A combination of factors, including increasingly stringent fuel economy and emissions standards, is pushing the auto industry to reconsider its powertrain production strategies to electrification. Basic stop-start vehicles (SSVs) have become ubiquitous in many markets, and manufacturers are looking to advance the technology by increasing the operating voltage from 12 V to 48 V. : According to a new report from , global sales of light duty SSVs will exceed 57.6 million by 2026, accounting for 54 percent of all light duty vehicle sales—of these, about 21 percent will feature 48 V components.

“Current systems have reached the limit of practical electrical power availability at 12 V, and because efficiency and automation demands can be realized only by increasing the operating voltage, 48 V is the practical limit to avoid the need for additional safety protection,” says Sam Abuelsamid, senior research analyst at Navigant Research. “48 V stop-start systems will combine with other technologies, including micro- and mild-hybrid capabilities and electric turbochargers, to increase efficiency without the adoption of full hybrid or plug-in electric capability.”

This shift is expected to enable countries around the world to work toward meeting new policies and regulations designed to limit emissions and boost fuel economy, according to the report. New testing methodologies such as the World Light Duty Test Protocol (WLTP) and real driving emissions (RDE) tests, in addition to proposed bans on traditional internal combustion engines from the 2030s and 2040s onward in Europe and Asia, are just some of the challenges manufacturers hope low voltage electrification can overcome.

The report, , analyzes the global market for low voltage electrification opportunities and challenges. The study provides an overview of the market issues associated with improving light duty vehicle efficiency and the technologies that are likely to reach production. Global market forecasts for vehicle sales and the value of key components, segmented by global region, extend through 2026. The report also examines the main 48 V components related to low voltage vehicle electrification. An Executive Summary of the report is available for free download on the .

Contact: Lindsay Funicello-Paul

+1.781.270.8456

* The information contained in this press release concerning the report, Market Data: Low Voltage Vehicle Electrification, is a summary and reflects Navigant Research’s current expectations based on market data and trend analysis. Market predictions and expectations are inherently uncertain and actual results may differ materially from those contained in this press release or the report. Please refer to the full report for a complete understanding of the assumptions underlying the report’s conclusions and the methodologies used to create the report. Neither Navigant Research nor Navigant undertakes any obligation to update any of the information contained in this press release or the report.

Read more: Global Sales of Light Duty Stop-Start Vehicles...

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