gst implemenation, jain irrigation gst implementation, gst benefits to farmers, farmers gst benefit Jain Irrigation, with more than 10,000 associates worldwide and revenue of over Rs 60 billion, is an Indian multinational company with manufacturing plants in 28 locations across the globe.

Jain Irrigation today said it will pass on to consumers and farmers the benefit of reduced GST rate on drip irrigation systems. The GST Council in a meeting yesterday reduced the GST rate on drip irrigation systems including laterals, sprinkler products to 12 per cent from 18 per cent. “The new GST rate shall be effective January, 25 2018,” the company said in a BSE filing adding that it has decided to pass on this benefit of 6 per cent directly to customers/farmers. Jain Irrigation hailed the government’s decision to encourage farmers to invest in efficient irrigation systems which save water and improve productivity. “We estimate that this action will have positive impact in the upcoming busy season for our drip irrigation division,” the company said.

Jain Irrigation, with more than 10,000 associates worldwide and revenue of over Rs 60 billion, is an Indian multinational company with manufacturing plants in 28 locations across the globe. It is engaged in manufacturing of micro irrigation systems, PVC pipes, HDPE pipes, plastic sheets, agro processed products, renewable energy solutions, tissue culture plants, financial services and other agricultural inputs since last 34 years.

Read more: Jain Irrigation to pass on benefit of GST rate cut

Thermal power generation , coal,  thermal power plants, renewable energy, coal power assets, Uttar Pradesh, Jammu and Kashmir The plant load factor (PLF) at thermal power plants in the first three quarters was 63.8%, more than four percentage points higher than the corresponding period in FY17. (Reuters)

Coal-based thermal power plants generated 87.8 billion units (BU) of electricity in December 2017 · about 2 BU less than the production in the corresponding month in 2016. However, for the nine-month period in FY18, the overall thermal generation went up by 4% to 768 BU. The plant load factor (PLF) at thermal power plants in the first three quarters was 63.8%, more than four percentage points higher than the corresponding period in FY17.There was a power supply shortage of 2.8% during the hours when electricity demand was highest in December 2017. Uttar Pradesh recorded a massive peak shortage of 335 MW, second only to Jammu and Kashmir (552 MW). The peak deficit was only 0.5% in December 2016.Since electricity cannot be stored, generation is the most robust indicator of demand. However, as renewable electricity production data is not available yet, it is difficult to attribute the lower thermal generation in December solely to fall in power demand as the rise in share of renewables can also play a role. Usually, renewable sources produce 6-12% of the overall electricity in the country, while coal-based power generate 85-90%.

Nevertheless, thermal power generators, mired in a scenario where demand growth is muted and installed production capacity is twice the levels of peak demand, may draw some respite from the fact that generation capacity addition in April-December was only 4,300 MW, 39% down annually. This is the second instance in the ongoing fiscal where monthly thermal generation slipped on a year-on-year basis, invoking apprehensions about transition to renewable energy posing risks to thermal power. A report on renewable energy integration, co-authored by national grid operator
Power System Operation Corporation, had pointed that adding 175 GW of renewable energy would lead to PLF of coal-based power plants dropping to around 50%, with 65,000 MW plants running at PLFs below 30%.

The Economic Survey published by the finance ministry in August 2017 had also noted that the social cost of renewables was around Rs 11 per unit in FY17, accounting for the sub-optimal utilisation of coal-based power assets as a result of shift to renewables. Research agencies such as Icra estimate the size of financially stressed assets to be around 60GW due to lack of power purchase agreements (PPA), shortage of gas and under-recovery caused by pricing issues of imported coal. About Rs 4 lakh crore of debt is likely to become NPA if prevailing issues are not resolved.

Read more: Thermal power generation slips year-on-year in...

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