Yesterday, ENGIE took advantage of the attractive market conditions to place its first Green Hybrid Bond (Deeply Subordinated Perpetual Bond) of an amount of 1 billion of euros, with a coupon of 1.375% and a Non-Call period of 5.25 years. The bond is intended to replace the € 600M 3.875% Non-Call2018 and the GBP 300M 4.625% Non-Call2019.

The proceeds of this issue will be allocated to the Group’s continued growth in renewable energy or energy efficiency projects, natural resources preservation projects, as well as R&D investments in such areas.

The Green Format of the bond reaffirms the strong commitment of Engie to its sustainable growth strategy. Taking advantage of strong investor demand for higher yielding asset classes (including Hybrid bonds), the coupon of the bond, callable as from April 2023, has been set at 1.375%, representing the lowest coupon rate ever achieved by a corporate issuer for a hybrid bond.

The bond was issued under the Group’s Green Bond Framework and has received a Second Party Opinion delivered by Vigeo Eiris. Both documents are published on the Group’s website.

With this issuance the total amount of bonds issued by ENGIE in Green Bond format reaches 6.25 Billion of euros, making Engie the largest Corporate issuer of Green bonds globally. The bond has received rating of Baa1, BBB and BBB+ from Moody's, S&P and Fitch respectively.

About ENGIE

ENGIE is committed to taking on the major challenges of the energy revolution, towards a world more decarbonised, decentralised and digitalised. The Group aims to become the leader of this new energy world by focusing on three key activities for the future: low carbon generation in particular from natural gas and renewable energy, energy infrastructure and efficient solutions adapted to all its customers (individuals, businesses, territories, etc.). Innovation, digital solutions and customer satisfaction are the guiding principles of ENGIE’s development. ENGIE is active in around 70 countries, employs 150,000 people worldwide and achieved revenues of €66.6 billion in 2016. The Group is listed on the Paris and Brussels stock exchanges (ENGI) and is represented in the main financial indices (CAC 40, BEL 20, DJ Euro Stoxx 50, Euronext 100, FTSE Eurotop 100, MSCI Europe) and non-financial indices (DJSI World, DJSI Europe and Euronext Vigeo Eiris - World 120, Eurozone 120, Europe 120, France 20, CAC 40 Governance).

Read more: ENGIE sets new hybrid bond record with the...

ATLANTA, Jan. 10, 2018 /PRNewswire/ -- Georgia Power today announced the selection of 42 new teachers from across the state to receive one of the company's annual $1,000 New Teacher Assistance Grants. Since the program's inception in 2004, the company has awarded a total of $445,000 in individual grants to more than 400 new teachers from communities across the state. The grants provide the state's newest teachers with funds to purchase classroom supplies and start their teaching careers.

"Georgia's students are our future workforce and are learning the skills they need to be successful every day in the classroom," said Anne Kaiser, vice president of community and economic development for Georgia Power. "Supporting high quality public education starts with supporting the educators on the front lines and the grants are one way that we can show new teachers that their work is appreciated."

Georgia public colleges and universities that have schools of education submitted the final nominations. To be eligible for a grant, candidates must be in the top 25 percent of their class, be a first-year teacher employed by a public school in Georgia and demonstrate a high aptitude for teaching.

The recipients vary from pre-K to elementary, middle and high school teachers. Teachers are encouraged to use the funds to purchase school items such as books, educational CDs or DVDs, computers, projectors, or other supplies to enhance their classrooms and student's learning experience.

2017 New Teacher Assistant Grant recipients include:

Central Georgia

  • Zachary Ralph Griffin, Macon (Bibb County School District)
  • Meagan Kaylee Pittman, Perry (Houston County School District)

Coastal Georgia

  • Raven Davis, Savannah (Savannah-Chatham County Schools)
  • Donnie Jones, Savannah (Savannah-Chatham County Schools)
  • Nicole Williams Harris, Savannah (Savannah-Chatham County Schools)
  • Carly Elizabeth Chevalier, Metter (Candler County School District)
  • Sarah Herrin, Jesup (Wayne County School District)
  • Ashley Marie Galloway, Nahunta (Brantley County School District)
  • Kevin Judy, Swainsboro (Emanuel County Schools)
  • Hayward Johnson, Swainsboro (Emanuel County Schools)

East Georgia

  • Tara Swinson, Augusta (Richmond County School District)
  • Keenan Jackson, Thomson (McDuffie County Schools)
  • Taylor Thompson, Evans (Columbia County School System)
  • John Goldberg, Evans (Columbia County School System)

Metro Atlanta

  • Randal James Taylor, Suwanee (Gwinnett County Public Schools)
  • Esmeralda Trevino, Suwanee (Gwinnett County Public Schools)
  • Todd Schuggerow, Cumming (Forsyth County Schools)
  • Maria L. Soto, Suwanee (Gwinnett County Public Schools)
  • Alexander Petch, Newnan (Coweta County Schools)
  • Jasmine Hill, Atlanta (Atlanta Public Schools)
  • Robert Brown, Jonesboro (Clayton County Public Schools)
  • Anslee Duff, Jonesboro (Clayton County Public Schools)
  • Michael Claudius, Jonesboro (Clayton County Public Schools)
  • David Handley, Douglas (Coffee County Schools)
  • Michael Benjamin, Conyers (Rockdale County Schools)
  • Chikima Brantley, McDonough (Henry County Schools)
  • Maci Shearouse, McDonough (Henry County Schools)
  • Darryl Baynes, Stone Mountain (DeKalb County School District)

Northeast Georgia

  • Chrishandra Coletha Perkins, Greensboro (Greene County School District)
  • J. Seth Warner, Winder (Barrow County School District)
  • Darby Smith Bozeman, Winder (Barrow County Schools)
  • Chelsea Freihaut, Athens (Clarke County School District)

Northwest Georgia

  • Daniel Merritt, Lafayette (Walker County School District)
  • Ernestina Gonzales, Chatsworth (Murray County School District)
  • Marla Williams, Carrollton (Carroll County)

South Region

  • Keidra Nicole Green, Cordele (Crisp County School District)
  • Joseph Wiggins, Thomasville (Thomas County School District)
  • Raylee Clack Etheridge, Leesburg (Lee County School District)
  • Chatabious Thomas, Albany (Dougherty County School District)
  • Kelly Gordon, Valdosta (Lowndes County Schools)

West Georgia

  • Shelby Merriweather, Columbus (Muscogee County School District)
  • Corey Reed, Barnesville (Lamar County School District)

Georgia Power has been a partner with the state's public education system for more than 100 years – from supporting the work of groups such as Junior Achievement, to providing new teacher assistance grants, to hosting students at the company's generation facilities, Georgia Power works to help students achieve their full potential. For more information about how the company is helping advance education and build the highly skilled workforce of tomorrow, visit www.georgiapower.com/education.    

About Georgia Power
Georgia Power is the largest electric subsidiary of Southern Company (NYSE: SO), America's premier energy company. Value, Reliability, Customer Service and Stewardship are the cornerstones of the company's promise to 2.5 million customers in all but four of Georgia's 159 counties. Committed to delivering clean, safe, reliable and affordable energy at rates below the national average, Georgia Power maintains a diverse, innovative generation mix that includes nuclear, coal and natural gas, as well as renewables such as solar, hydroelectric and wind. Georgia Power focuses on delivering world-class service to its customers every day and the company is consistently recognized by J.D. Power and Associates as an industry leader in customer satisfaction. For more information, visit www.GeorgiaPower.com and connect with the company on Facebook (Facebook.com/GeorgiaPower), Twitter (Twitter.com/GeorgiaPower) and Instagram (Instagram.com/ga_power).

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SOURCE Georgia Power

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PALO ALTO, Calif., Jan. 10, 2018 /PRNewswire/ -- Palo Alto-based Aurora Solar today announced that the Connecticut Green Bank has joined rebate authorities around the country in declaring Aurora's remote shading simulation software an acceptable replacement for the time-consuming and costly onsite inspections previously required when applying for rebates associated with solar system installations. Aurora incorporates the measurements of a site's solar potential as part of a standardized "Solar Shade Report" that consolidates all the information solar companies need in making financing, installation, and rebate decisions.

With this announcement, Aurora becomes the industry's most validated and widely accepted solar design software. The results of Aurora's web-based software are accurate and reliable enough to replace measurements collected through a physical site visit and inspection. Rebate authorities that accept Aurora's remote shading include:

  • CT Green Bank
  • New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA)
  • Rhode Island Renewable Energy Fund
  • Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC)
  • New Jersey Clean Energy Fund
  • City of Roseville Residential Solar Energy Program
  • Oncor
  • Energy Trust of Oregon

Measurements providing the solar potential of a roof are a crucial piece of information that installers, private financing firms, and government rebate authorities rely upon in designing solar systems, and issuing financing and rebates for their installation. The US Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL) has validated that Aurora Solar's shade reports are statistically equivalent to on-site measurements. Accordingly, NREL estimates that Aurora with its remote shading analysis can save installers $0.17/W on a 5-kW system (~$850 per install).

Faster, Cheaper, Safer

Until Aurora's breakthrough, the industry—solar installers, financing firms, and government authorities—relied on dangerous, costly, and time-consuming on-site surveys. These required travel to a homeowner's residence, climbing on its roof, and taking manual readings to determine the level of sunlight and shading.

This process frequently takes at least half a day and typically costs hundreds of dollars. Moreover, it is subject to error, requiring time-consuming and expensive repeat surveys.

While prices for solar hardware have fallen by over 70% in the past 10 years, "soft costs" have remained stubbornly high due to these on-site surveys and other related activities, inhibiting residential adoption. These soft costs now comprise more than half the cost of a typical solar installation. Being able to quickly and accurately calculate a roof's solar potential promises to slash the expense involved in quoting a solar installation.

Aurora's novel methodology relies on algorithmically generating a 3D reconstruction of a building, and then simulating the sun's path over the site in order to determine the roof's solar potential. Using Aurora's algorithms, anyone with web access can quickly generate an accurate report detailing the irradiance and shading of any surface in the world.

For More Information

Product and pricing information is available at www.aurorasolar.com.

ABOUT AURORA:
Aurora was founded in 2013 by two Stanford graduate students, Sam and Chris, who bonded over a shared vision of proliferating solar energy in emerging markets. While still full-time students they spent a year designing, and eventually installing, a solar installation in East Africa. Their system powered a boarding school, farm and housing units.

To their surprise, the major roadblock to deploying solar was not finding customers or the physical delivery of system hardware, but rather the actual design process which was time consuming and expensive. Prompted by this insight, they turned their energies to developing software to improve and accelerate solar system design. They recruited top engineers and scientists from leading universities like Stanford, Carnegie Mellon, and Brown, as well as solar industry veterans.

Industry-leading solar companies, both small and large, use Aurora to design better solar. Currently, over 50,000 solar projects a month are designed in Aurora.

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SOURCE Aurora Solar Inc.

Related Links

http://www.aurorasolar.com

Read more: CT Green Bank Now Accepts Aurora Solar's Remote...

Once New York Governor Andrew Cuomo endorsed energy storage as a component of his clean energy strategy, he went in big.

Cuomo kicked off 2018 with a series of clean energy proposals, including a groundbreaking energy storage pledge: to deploy 1,500 megawatts by 2025 as the state works toward 50 percent renewable energy by 2030. The target came just a month after he signed a bill to create a storage deployment program.

That's a bigger target than California's trend-setting 1,300 megawatt mandate, although it comes due five years later, when storage will be much cheaper and less bleeding-edge. New York's goal aims higher than the 200 megawatt-hours Massachusetts proposed and makes Oregon's 5 megawatt-hour goal look weak.

"New York intends to be a leading state for energy storage deployment," said Alicia Barton, president and CEO of the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA), which will disburse funds for storage projects and oversees an ongoing storage roadmap process. "This helps us put a stake in ground to say New York is a market where you should be spending time."

The eye-popping number marks a coup for energy storage, which had been largely left out of energy policy developments under New York's four-year effort to overhaul its grid. Cuomo launched his clean energy mandate in the summer of 2016, but grid assets to store the influx of intermittent energy didn't factor into that plan.

In the months after the storage bill passed the legislature, Cuomo's Energy Czar Richard Kauffman voiced concern about how a top-down storage mandate would fit with New York's commitment to promoting clean energy through sustainable, market-driven mechanisms.

The administration has found a path forward that satisfies its concerns. New York will not require its utilities to procure 1,500 megawatts, in the way California compelled its investor owned utilities. Instead, the target directs the state's energy bureaucracy to clear out the hurdles that have thwarted a storage market thus far, and signals to industry members that New York wants their business.

The administration is already putting money behind the aspiration: $260 million will flow from NYSERDA to jump-start energy storage activity, which Cuomo hopes will one day produce 30,000 jobs for New York. The state will also take steps to crack down on the local and greenhouse gas pollution caused by fossil-fueled peak power plants, opening a potential role for storage to take their place.

Top-tier target

Cuomo's target stakes a claim on energy storage leadership, but it's important to parse exactly what those 1,500 megawatts mean. 

It's not a legally binding mandate like California's, but it's being embedded into New York's energy market redesign. The storage legislation signed last year calls for a firm target pegged to 2030, which coincides with the renewables mandate; the latest announcement sets an interim checkpoint for the state to hit on the way to that point.

"It instills a sense of urgency to our work and a clarity about that urgency," Barton said. "It puts regulators and implementing agencies like NYSERDA on notice of the target we need to be aiming for in our work."

The target is separate from the means to achieve it, Barton added.

Picking a number out of thin air doesn't make an industry materialize. Instead, structural changes to energy policy and regulations allow storage providers to compete and make money for the services they provide. Those changes could include wonky items like pinning down the locational value of storage on the distribution grid and streamlining the fire safety approval process.

"If the market signals were working correctly now, we'd see projects going forward at a more rapid pace than they have so far," Barton said.

The interim target strikes a crucial balance of ambition and achievability, said Polly Shaw, VP of regulatory affairs and communications at commercial storage provider Stem, which is active in New York. 

"We’re poised to ramp up our activity in the state once the target and funding are translated into real commercial opportunities for the customer-facing sector," she said.

The success of the 2025 target will hinge on whether it spurs state agencies to clear out the regulatory barriers in a timely manner. If the industry can operate profitably on its own, it could deploy well beyond the aspiration of 1,500 megawatts.

"The size of the market for energy storage in New York is probably a lot larger than that," said William Acker, executive director of the New York Battery and Energy Storage Technology Consortium. "These targets are not setting a number that indicates the market, it's catalyzing the industry and stakeholders to go and make it happen."

Money to spend

To back up the commitment to energy storage as a newfound pillar of his energy policy, Cuomo earmarked a few hundred million dollars to get things started.

NYSERDA's Green Bank will invest $200 million to ramp up financing for energy storage projects. The Green Bank's role is to open up private investment in clean energy by addressing barriers to financing, and with storage it will have its work cut out.

The combination of technology risk, emerging business models and the inherent complexity of batteries performing multiple jobs at once gives financiers a headache. The Green Bank may be able to serve the need for capital while other lenders get more comfortable with storage.

NYSERDA's Clean Energy Fund will disburse a further $60 million, allocated in buckets: soft cost reduction and business model pilots; product development and field testing; and grid modernization and resiliency.

The destination of these funds, plus the governor's reference to 30,000 potential energy storage jobs, reframe this grid asset as an economic driver.

"That is a really important recognition of the fact that doing the right thing for the environment and for the efficiency of the grid can create great economic development opportunities for the state," Acker said.

Peakers put on notice

The govenor's missive explicitly recognized the harm done by peaker plants, both as greenhouse gas emissions and local pollutants.

In New York City particularly, a fleet of decades old peaker plants located largely within poor and minority neighborhoods. NY-BEST studied this problem in 2017, because storage, unlike new gas plants, can feasibly slip into urban areas to replace peaker plants in providing local capacity without the harmful local emissions.

The physical attributes of energy storage lend themselves to environmental justice applications, but that potential hasn't led to much action just yet. A developing case in Oxnard, California, could become the first time storage beats out a new gas peaker. New York could tackle the older and dirtier peakers it already has.

Specifically, Cuomo ordered the Department of Environmental Conservation to reduce smog-forming pollution from peak power plants, and called for regulating peak plants under the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative "by grouping together and thereby covering peaking units that collectively exceed RGGI's capacity threshold of 25 megawatts."

"Applying appropriate emission requirements to the peaker plants and considering environmental justice will likely create a great deal of opportunity," Acker said.

The exact mechanism for replacing the dirtiest plants with clean technology remains to be seen. What is clear is that the new year has kicked off with a healthy boost for the storage industry.

First Massachusetts awarded $20 million for a batch of battery systems in December, then New York delivered its promises of money and projects to come.

"The industry has been champing at the bit in New York and Governor Cuomo deserves credit for clearing the air and stating clearly that storage is ready to bring billions of dollars of benefits to New Yorkers," said Ray Hohenstein, market applications director at the newly formed storage developer Fluence. "It's the moment we've all been waiting for."

The execution of the proposals will determine whether the opportunity stays on paper, or if New York evolves into a nation-leading storage market.

Read more: The Best News Yet for Energy Storage in New York

BERLIN, Jan. 10, 2018 /PRNewswire/ -- NEUTRINO energy, once thought to be a technological and physical impossibility, is now developing into a global sensation. It is the next step of the electric age.

Neutrino Deutschland Gmbh
Neutrino Deutschland Gmbh

The signs were already present in the fall of 2015: At this time two researchers from NEUTRINO's international team were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics. Working independently of one another, both the Japanese scientist Takaaki Kajita and Canadian physicist Arthur McDonald were able to prove that neutrinos, tiny cosmic particles which permeate almost everything in the universe and which had long been believed to be massless, do in fact possess mass. This discovery was made possible thanks to testing methods developed by Kajita and McDonald.

At the moment of this discovery, however, very few people actually grasped its significance for humanity.

Neutrinos are high-energy particles that reach the earth in a never-ending flow. Unlike the visible spectrum of the light from the sun, this form of radiation cannot be perceived with the naked eye, and yet it is their mass that makes neutrinos the energy source of the future.

As Einstein already established: e=mc2. According to the Theory of Relativity everything which possesses mass also contains energy. It has been possible to verify and measure NEUTRINO energy under experimental conditions for several years now, however, the researchers who dreamed of tapping this energy were often mocked, and the energy itself was deemed to be supposedly non-existent, physically impossible, and thus not utilizable.

Nevertheless, one can hardly imagine the vast possibilities that the harnessing of NEUTRINO energy will open up in just a few short years. The principle is basically the same as that of a conventional solar cell, but with the advantage that a neutrino energy transformer is also able to deliver power in complete darkness. The neutrinos themselves are not captured in this process; instead, a portion of their kinetic energy is converted into electricity.

The cells require no light whatsoever. They transform a segment of the nonvisible spectrum into energy 365 days a year, 24 hours a day, and at any point on the earth's surface. This will of course have an enormous impact on the world's energy markets in the coming decades, as well as on industry and economy. Business models will change. Some sectors will disappear completely, while others will come into being.

A team from NEUTRINO Germany GmbH made up of international researchers and universities is currently working under the supervision of Holger Thorsten Schubart on the development of the first technical devices that will be able to convert NEUTRINO energy into electrical power for the end user. NEUTRINO Germany GmbH is a subsidiary of Neutrino Inc., located in the United States.

The initial goal is the harnessing of enough energy to power small electronic devices such as mobile phones so that the battery can be charged continuously without a cable using NEUTRINO radiation alone. Electrically powered vehicles (the new PI brand of the NEUTRINO ENERGY GROUP) that never need to stop at a charging station and thus have a virtually limitless range are the next step; and finally after years of exhausting research, the conversion of enough NEUTRINO energy to cover the needs of entire households.

In the future heating and energy will be provided through NEUTRINO Power-Cubes, thus eliminating the present reliance upon environmentally harmful substances such as oil and natural gas. And because these Power-Cubes will be implemented directly at the point where the energy is needed, it will also become unnecessary to produce electricity centrally and then send it hundreds of kilometers at great loss. Batteries will serve merely to bridge the gap during short periods of unusually high energy consumption.

Mass means energy, and there's no way to stop the future! With this new technology, we will finally have the means to meet our energy needs fairly and ecologically, thus putting an end to the geopolitical struggles and armed conflicts for natural resources that threaten the entire planet.

In a few short decades, the lives of all of us could be safer and more fulfilling.

We can shape the future with scientific knowledge, or we can deny and suppress what science teaches us for countless reasons. The decision is ours to make, but: "He who is ignorant of the truth is merely a fool; he who knows it and calls it a lie is a criminal." (Galileo Galilei)

Our political institutions have a duty to lead the way today. 2018 the energy revolution is continued consistently. The sun and the time are the two unbeatable allies of the Neutrino Energy concept.

Sources: Science for Innovation, Future and Environmental Protection; the "We give light"-Foundation i.G.; the NEUTRINO Energy Group: www.neutrino-energy.com, and For Fairer World Technologies by Holger Thorsten Schubart.

Press Relations:
Heiko Schulze
Haus der Bundespressekonferenz 0413
Schiffbauer Damm 40
10117 Berlin
GERMANY
+49 30 726262700
+49 30 726262701

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http://www.neutrino-energy.com

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SOURCE Neutrino Deutschland Gmbh

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Read more: Neutrino Energy, the Coming Energy Revolution

MONTREAL--(BUSINESS WIRE)--EDF EN Canada Inc., a subsidiary of EDF Energies Nouvelles, Régie intermunicipale de l’énergie du Bas-Saint-Laurent (RIEBSL), and Régie intermunicipale de l'énergie Gaspésie-Îles-de-la-Madeleine (RIEGÎM), are pleased to announce the commissioning of the Nicolas-Riou wind project. This 224.25 megawatt (MW) project comprises 65 turbines of 3.45 MW supplied by Vestas. Nicolas-Riou is 50-percent owned by EDF EN Canada, 33-percent by RIEBSL and 17-percent by RIEGÎM.

Located in the Bas-Saint-Laurent region, on the private and public lands of TNO Boisbouscache and the municipalities of Sainte-Françoise, Saint-Mathieu-de-Rioux, Saint-Médard (RCM Basques) and Saint-Eugene-de-Ladrière (RCM of Rimouski-Neigette) Nicolas-Riou Wind Project represents an investment of more than CAD $500 million. Construction commenced in June 2016 employing over 400 workers during its peak.

In addition to the profits distributed to the municipal shareholders, an annual contribution of over CAD $1.1 million will be provided to the Bas-Saint-Laurent and Gaspésie regions, particularly to the Basques and Rimouski-Neigette RCMs throughout the 25-year contract with Hydro-Québec.

“The Nicolas-Riou Wind Project mobilized all regional county municipalities (RCM) in Bas-Saint-Laurent and Gaspésie–Îles-de-la-Madeleine, as well as the Maliseet of Viger First Nation, who invested together with their respective municipalities and EDF EN Canada for the capital expenditures. This exceptional partnership is coupled with a desire to boost regional economic development by capitalizing on the local wind resource,” said Cory Basil, Vice President, Development for EDF EN Canada. “We are very excited to have formed a strong partnership with RIEBSL and RIEGÎM. This project is the result of a partnership that pairs the experience and expertise of EDF EN Canada with the understanding of local expectations brought by our public partners.”

According to Michel Lagacé, president of RIEBSL, “Pride is the word that sums up the last nine years of the local authority’s commitment to build Canada’s largest equally owned community project. Nicolas-Riou represents a great public-private achievement resulted from the addition of the partners’ skills. Thank you to the development and construction teams of EDF EN Canada for the hard work! We look forward to many years of continued collaboration and success.”

Simon Deschênes, president of RIEGÎM, said, “The RCMs of Gaspésie are very pleased with the commissioning of the Nicolas-Riou Community Wind Project, and we want to highlight the excellent collaboration of all our partners who made possible this ambitious and very stunning project.”

On December 22, 2017, a $340 million, non-recourse, full term project financing was arranged and fully underwritten by National Bank Financial Markets, as co-lead arranger and sole book runner, and Sun Life Assurance Company of Canada, as co-lead arranger.

Nicolas-Riou is one of eight wind projects awarded to EDF EN Canada through Hydro-Québec Distribution’s call for tenders in 2008, 2010 and 2013. It also represents the fifth project held in partnership with one or more RCM; the other four being La Mitis (24.6 MW), Le Granit (24.6 MW), Lac Alfred (300 MW) and Rivière-du-Moulin (350 MW). Since 2008, EDF EN Canada has placed in service 1,600 MW of wind and solar projects in Canada.

ABOUT EDF EN CANADA INC.:

EDF EN Canada, a subsidiary of EDF Energies Nouvelles, is a market leader in renewable energy, with more than 1,600 MW of wind and solar power facilities in service or under development. Headquartered in Toronto and Montreal, EDF EN Canada employs an integrated approach to project development covering all aspects from conception to commissioning through to generation and long-term operations. The subsidiary offers financial strength, technological innovation and an emphasis on service. EDF EN Canada draws on the market expertise of EDF Renewable Energy, EDF Energies Nouvelles’ U.S. subsidiary. EDF Energies Nouvelles is 100% owned by the EDF Group. www.edf-energies-nouvelles.com www.edf-en.ca

ABOUT RÉGIE INTERMUNICIPALE DE L’ÉNERGIE GASPÉSIE–ÎLES-DE-LA-MADELEINE (RIEGÎM):

Established in 2009, the Régie intermunicipale de l’Énergie Gaspésie–Îles-de-la-Madeleine is comprised of the five Regional County Municipalities (RCM) of this administrative region and the Îles-de-la-Madeleine conglomeration.

ABOUT RÉGIE INTERMUNICIPALE DE L’ÉNERGIE DU BAS-SAINT-LAURENT (RIEBSL):

Régie intermunicipale de l’énergie du Bas-Saint-Laurent (RIEBSL), formerly named Énergie Éolienne Bas-Saint-Laurent, was created in June 2014 in relations with Hydro-Québec’s 2013 call for tenders (A/O 2013-01) by the eight Regional County Municipalities (RCM) of the Bas-Saint-Laurent region and the Viger Maliseet First Nation. In July 2014, the two companies joined to create the Alliance Éolienne de l’Est to jointly invest, under 50 percent partnerships, in wind projects in both regions, with private companies.

Read more: RIEBSL, RIEGÎM and EDF EN Canada Announce the...

PUNE, India, January 10, 2018 /PRNewswire/ --

ReportsnReports.com adds 2018 global Pulse Oximetry market research with other worldwide and regional Pulse Oximetry reports to advanced materials section of its online business intelligence library.

Complete report on the Pulse Oximetry market spread across 112 pages, profiling 16 companies and supported with 187 tables and figures is now available at

http://www.reportsnreports.com/reports/1282928-global-pulse-oximetry-market-research-report-2018.html .

The Global Pulse Oximetry Industry 2018 Market Research Report is a professional and in-depth study on the current state of the Pulse Oximetry industry. Firstly, the report provides a basic overview of the industry including definitions, classifications, applications and industry chain structure. The Pulse Oximetry market analysis is provided for the international market including development history, competitive landscape analysis, and major regions' development status. Secondly, development policies and plans are discussed as well as manufacturing processes and cost structures. This report also states import/export, supply and consumption figures as well as cost, price, revenue and gross margin by regions (North America, Europe, China, Japan, Southeast Asia, India), and other regions can be added. Few key manufacturers included in this report are Masimo Corp, CAS Medical Systems, Zensorium, Covidien PLC, Medtronic, Opto Circuits, Nonin Medical, Smith Medical, Carefusion, Spacelabs Healthcare, GE Healthcare, Meditech, Nihon Kohden, Philips Healthcare, Criticare Systems, Welch Allyn Holdings.

Order a copy of Global Pulse Oximetry Market Report 2018 research report at http://www.reportsnreports.com/purchase.aspx?name=1282928 .

The report focuses on global major leading industry players with information such as company profiles, product picture and specification, capacity, production, price, cost, revenue and contact information. Upstream raw materials, equipment and downstream consumers analysis is also carried out. What's more, the Pulse Oximetry industry development trends and marketing channels are analyzed. Finally, the feasibility of new investment projects is assessed, and overall research conclusions are offered.

With 187 tables and figures to support the Pulse Oximetry market analysis, this research provides key statistics on the state of the industry and is a valuable source of guidance and direction for companies and individuals interested in the market. 2018-2025 forecasts for Pulse Oximetry market provided in this report include 2018-2025 Pulse Oximetry Market capacity production overview, production market share, sales overview, supply sales and shortage, import export consumption and cost price production value gross margin.

Some of the tables and figures provided in Global Pulse Oximetry Market Report 2018 research report include:

Table Mossi Ghisolfi Group Information List
Figure Pulse Oximetry Picture and Specifications of Mossi Ghisolfi Group
Table Pulse Oximetry Capacity (K MT), Production (K MT), Price (USD/MT), Cost (USD/MT), Gross (USD/MT), Revenue (M USD) and Gross Margin of Mossi Ghisolfi Group 2013-2018
Figure Pulse Oximetry Capacity (K MT), Production (K MT) and Growth Rate of Mossi Ghisolfi Group 2013-2018
Figure Pulse Oximetry Production (K MT) and Global Market Share of Mossi Ghisolfi Group 2013-2018
Table Nan Ya Plastics Information List
Figure Pulse Oximetry Picture and Specifications of Nan Ya Plastics
Table Pulse Oximetry Capacity (K MT), Production (K MT), Price (USD/MT), Cost (USD/MT), Gross (USD/MT), Revenue (M USD) and Gross Margin of Nan Ya Plastics 2013-2018
Figure Pulse Oximetry Capacity (K MT), Production (K MT) and Growth Rate of Nan Ya Plastics 2013-2018


Another research titled "United States Pulse Oximetry Industry 2017 Market Research Report" is a professional and in-depth study on the current state of the United States Pulse Oximetry industry with a focus on the global market. The report focuses on United States major leading industry players providing information such as company profiles, product picture and specification, capacity, production, price, cost, revenue and contact information. Companies profiled this research includes Masimo, Medtronic, Nonin Medical, Smiths Medical, Nihon-Kohden, Philips, GE Healthcare, Konica Minolta, Mindray, Heal Force, Contec, Jerry Medical, Solaris.

On the basis of product, this report displays the production, revenue, price, market share and growth rate of each type, primarily split into Disposable Sensor and Reusable Sensors. Also On the basis on the end users/applications, this report focuses on the status and outlook for major applications/end users, sales volume, market share and growth rate for each application, including, Hospital, Ambulatory Surgical Center and Home Care.


With 175 tables and figures, the report is available at http://www.reportsnreports.com/reports/1003598-united-states-pulse-oximetry-market-report-2017.html .

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As residential solar markets go, Alabama is about as small as you can get. 

Among the 43 states plus D.C. that GTM Research tracks individually, it ranks 42. It has just 1 megawatt of residential systems installed. According to GTM Research solar analyst Austin Perea, it’s hardly “a blip on the radar.”

“In the realm of what’s happening in residential solar, I’d say what’s happening in Alabama may be the least important thing,” said Perea. 

How did the state win that distinction? Through a mix of regressive policies.

Alabama doesn't have net metering, but it does have a fixed fee on any residential installations in Alabama Power’s service area, the utility that covers the southern two-thirds of the state.  

“I’d say it’s particularly regressive that they don’t have net metering. It’s middle-of-the-road regressive with respect to the fixed charges,” said Perea. “The more regressive element of their approach is not having a mechanism by which you can export energy back to the grid and still get the full retail rate. In most markets that is the primary revenue by which you can make solar economic.”

“The markets that see growth in residential solar are the ones that have enabling policy, the ones that allow folks to have some economic benefit,” he added. 

Alabama is one of just three states, including Tennessee and South Dakota, that doesn’t have net-metering policies. Alabama Power, the state's largest utility, does not offer retail rate net metering. The fixed fee makes the economics worse. 

“There’s not any real value proposition for actually going solar,” said Perea. “In most cases it would actually cost money.”

Wednesday marks the fifth anniversary of state regulators' approval of Alabama Power’s fee. It requires solar generating customers to pay $5 per kilowatt each month. For a 5-kilowatt system, that pencils out to $25 a month, $300 a year, and $9,000 over an installation’s possible 30-year lifetime. At the current national average price per watt at $2.92, a 5-kilowatt system costs $14,600. That fee adds more than 50 percent to the original cost.

Several years ago, many states were in the same position as Alabama. Small markets such as Kansas and Louisiana considered net metering changes as utilities worried about their bottom lines. The American Legislative Exchange Council drove many of those efforts with pre-written legislation that would reduce net metering or add fixed charges. Ultimately, few of those efforts succeeded.

Not so in Alabama. 

“If Alabama Power set out to prevent the development of a rooftop solar market in its territory, it has absolutely succeeded with this charge,” said Katie Ottenweller, a senior attorney at the Southern Environmental Law Center. “As far as I’ve been able to determine, this structure and this fee in particular, is the most punitive fee that has been adopted by any regulated utility in the country.”

Aside from the fee and lack of net metering regulations, the state also has no renewable energy portfolio standard. According to the Energy Information Administration, the state ranked 14 for net electricity generation from renewables in 2016. That calculation counts hydroelectric power, which accounts for 70 percent of the state’s renewable generation. 

Alabama Power pays for residents exporting solar back to the grid, but below retail rates. The legality of third-party financing also remains murky. The utility did not offer response to a request for comment about its net metering policies or its fee.

Alabama lies far outside the country’s top 10 solar markets, which make up about 90 percent of the country’s residential capacity. Perea said Alabama hits on the extreme end of states struggling to engage with the rapidly growing industry. Without the policy infrastructure in place, there’s basically nowhere for interested solar customers to go -- except off the grid. 

“We’re at this place where customers who go solar, not only are they surely being underpaid for their solar credits, but they’re really being punished,” said Ottenweller.

Read more: In Alabama, You Could Pay the Utility $9,000 for...

A chill has hit home solar. According to GTM Research’s latest U.S. Solar Market Insight Report, Q3 2017 was the third consecutive quarter that the residential solar market fell by installation volume.

It's easy to blame the “Big Three” for this downturn -- collectively, SolarCity, Vivint Solar and Sunrun are down 32 percent in installation volume over the first three quarters of 2016, according to the latest U.S. PV Leaderboard. At the same time, we talk about the rest of the market -- the long tail -- as though it were an aggregate force tempering the downfalls of the behemoth Big Three.

But what is really going on with the long tail? The “long tail” has been gradually gaining market share each quarter and now holds 70 percent of it, its highest share in four years. But this doesn’t paint a full picture.

Today, the long tail consists of nearly 3,000 active and distinct residential solar installation companies. Surely the strengths and operations of these individual companies cannot be in sync.

We can examine the residential solar market in California, the largest state market in the country, to get a glimpse at just how the so-called long tail is doing.

FIGURE: Installation Growth by Solar Company Type in California, Q1-Q3 2017 over Q1-Q3 2016

Source: GTM Research U.S. Downstream Distributed Solar Service

As shown above, the downturn in the California residential market was not only a function of installation declines by SolarCity, Vivint Solar and Sunrun. Rather, installers of all sizes fell collectively in the number of installations from last year.

Mid- to large-sized solar companies (defined for the purpose of this analysis as companies with a run rate of more than 200 installations in 2017) fell by more than 4,000 installations over last year. Smaller companies, many of which specialize in other services but also do solar installations, fell by more than 6,000 installations. In fact, the only installers who collectively grew in number of installations were companies that were new to the California market in 2017.

This picture makes the outlook for these new solar installers look pretty bleak. But again, the graph above uses a blunt grouping of companies, and not every company within each group gained or lost like the others.

FIGURE: Percentage of California Residential Solar Installers Growing, by Installer Size, Q1-Q3 2017 over Q1-Q3 2016

Source: GTM Research U.S. Downstream Distributed Solar Service

On the positive side, more than half of all solar installers doing more than 200 annual installations who were active in both 2016 and 2017 grew this year by number of installations. And if we dig deeper, the sweet spot for installation growth in California appears to be for companies in the 400 to 600 annual installation size range (between about 3 and 4 megawatts of capacity installed annually). For companies larger than this, as shown above, the prospect for growth diminishes incrementally.

So what is it that distinguishes the companies that are growing from the ones that are not? This question is at the forefront of so many minds as financiers, O&M providers, equipment suppliers and others seek to partner with growing (or at least stable) companies.

Perhaps the differences in success could be pinned to product offering. According to GTM Research’s U.S. Residential Solar Finance H2 2017 report, loans are quickly eclipsing lease and PPA offerings, which will make up just 37 percent of the residential market in 2017, down from 53 percent in 2016. It could be that companies selling loans are better positioned to deliver value to customers and therefore have greater growth prospects.

However, of the solar companies shown above that are growing, there is a wide range of product mixes. Of the companies that are growing in California, some do not offer any leases or PPAs, some sell as much as 98 percent of their systems with a lease or PPA, and others have a healthy mix of offerings. The average third party ownership percentage for these growing companies is just over thirty percent -- lower than the national average, but not by much.

There is no ‘silver bullet’ of product offerings. The key to healthy growth is not what a company is selling, but how it is selling it. The particular success of companies in the 400 to 600 annual installation range indicates that it is difficult to scale companies that are very small or very large.

It is difficult for a really small solar installer to build brand awareness and acquire customers. But after a certain size the company has generally built a strong referral network, at which point it has a good chance at growth -- that is, if it can keep customer acquisition costs low and design a sales channel mix that works for that particular business.

The long-held belief that customer acquisition is hard and plagues companies of all sizes still holds true, and the companies that can master it -- perhaps most easily done by mid-sized installation companies -- have the most promising outlooks.

***

Want to learn more about which solar companies are growing, where they are doing installations, and what products they are selling? GTM Research’s Solar Data Hub allows clients to view and manipulate interconnection data down to the city level for the entire long tail, and more. Contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for more information.

Read more: Beyond SolarCity, Vivint Solar and Sunrun: Who...

RICHMOND, Va., Jan. 10, 2018 /PRNewswire/ -- Backed by an ongoing $1 billion investment, Dominion Energy has grown its solar fleet in Virginia and North Carolina over the last two years from near zero to approximately 1,350 megawatts in service, in construction or under development. That is enough clean energy to power nearly 340,000 homes during peak sunshine.

Dominion Energy's solar fleet is ranked the sixth largest among owners of U.S. electric utilities, and according to the Solar Energy Industries Association, Virginia also is sixth in climbing the state rankings for solar energy.

"It's not just about Dominion Energy meeting its clean energy goals, it's also about helping our customers achieve theirs," said Paul Koonce, president and CEO of Dominion Energy's Power Generation Group. "We have a responsibility to offer the right programs, resources and solutions so our customers can make smart decisions about their energy future, and the key is we're doing it together."

The company's ever-expanding solar portfolio has provided an economic boost to the counties where the solar facilities are located. During construction, Dominion-developed projects have created 4,300 jobs in Virginia and North Carolina. Once operational, the projects are expected to generate more than $39 million annually in local economic impact.

Dominion Energy's long-term energy forecast calls for another 5,200 MW of new solar generation in the next 25 years, enough to power 1.3 million homes at peak output.

Here is how it's being accomplished:

In Virginia 

  • There are 27 solar generating facilities on 4,683 acres, which equates to about 444 MW of solar capacity either in operation or under development in the Commonwealth.
  • The construction of another 300 MW of solar is planned to support Facebook's eighth data center in the U.S., to be located in Henrico County.
  • As part of its Solar Partnership Program, company-owned rooftop or ground-mounted solar arrays are installed on leased commercial properties, such as Philip Morris, Capital One, Prologis, Canon, Merck and various educational institutions.
  • Large-scale solar facilities up to 100 MW in size are sprinkled across the state and are done in partnership with the Commonwealth of Virginia, the U.S. Navy, University of Virginia, Microsoft and Amazon.
  • Residential customers are participating in a private solar program that allows them to offset their energy usage with their own rooftop solar generating system.

In North Carolina

  • There are 13 projects totaling 353 MW that Dominion Energy has brought or is bringing online in North Carolina by 2019. Additionally, there are 82 projects owned by third-party developers that are operating or being developed totaling 550 MW.

"More and more companies have set their own goals for renewable energy and we will back them," Koonce said. "Our programs are intended to meet their needs and help strengthen Virginia's reputation as the ideal place to do business." 

Dominion Energy is seeking State Corporation Commission approval for a 100 percent renewable energy option for residential and small commercial and industrial customers, as well as an option for business customers to purchase renewable generation equal to a specific portion of their energy usage. In addition, once approved, the Community Solar Pilot Program will enable customers in Virginia to voluntarily purchase renewable energy from locally-sited solar installations to meet a portion of their needs.

The company is currently engaged in plans for a power grid modernization initiative. A smart energy grid will enable the company to seamlessly connect with cleaner energy resources, including private solar and other local generation sources.

Nationally, Dominion Energy has nearly 2,700 megawatts of solar generating capacity in operation or under development in nine states, including offtake agreements for the company's utility customers.

About Dominion Energy
Dominion Energy (NYSE: D) is one of the nation's largest producers and transporters of energy, with a portfolio of approximately 25,700 megawatts of generation, 15,000 miles of natural gas transmission, gathering and storage pipeline, and 6,600 miles of electric transmission lines. Dominion Energy operates one of the nation's largest natural gas storage systems with 1 trillion cubic feet of storage capacity and serves more than 6 million utility and retail energy customers. For more information about Dominion Energy, visit the company's website at www.dominionenergy.com.

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SOURCE Dominion Energy

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SALT LAKE CITY--(BUSINESS WIRE)--sPower has placed an order with Vestas, in a first-time partnership, for 2 MW and 4 MW compatible turbine components that qualify for 80 percent of the Production Tax Credit (“PTC”) and enable 400 MW of future project development.

Vestas is the energy industry’s global partner on sustainable energy solutions. They design, manufacture, install and service wind turbines across the globe, and with more than 87 GW of wind turbines in 76 countries, have installed more wind power than anyone else.

“We are looking forward to working with Vestas and adding their wind turbines to our fleet,” said Ryan Creamer, CEO of sPower. “These turbines add to our PTC qualified inventory and ensures sPower’s continued growth and economic development in the United States.”

“sPower has long been a respected energy leader and we are proud to work with them as they leverage their energy expertise into the wind market,” said Chris Brown, President of Vestas’ sales and service division in the United States and Canada. “These turbines generate millions of dollars in economic benefit and jobs growth, and support a thriving domestic manufacturing industry and supply chain that spans nearly every state.”

Over the next three years, wind energy, the #1 source of renewable energy capacity in US, is expected to generate over $85 billion of economic activity in the US, including the expansion of factories, millions of dollars in technology innovation investment and the addition of nearly 50,000 jobs across the wind value chain. In 2016, the wind industry added jobs nine times faster than the overall US economy, and today there are more than 102,000 wind workers in America.

Visit Vestas’ media page for updated photographs and videos: https://www.vestas.com/en/media/images.

About sPower

sPower, an AES and AIMCo company, is the largest private owner of operating solar assets in the United States. sPower owns and operates a portfolio of solar and wind assets greater than 1.3 GW and has a development pipeline of 10 GW+. For more information, visit www.sPower.com.

Read more: sPower Makes Wind Turbine Purchase from Vestas

ATLANTA, Jan. 10, 2018 /PRNewswire/ -- Georgia Power today announced the selection of 42 new teachers from across the state to receive one of the company's annual $1,000 New Teacher Assistance Grants. Since the program's inception in 2004, the company has awarded a total of $445,000 in individual grants to more than 400 new teachers from communities across the state. The grants provide the state's newest teachers with funds to purchase classroom supplies and start their teaching careers.

"Georgia's students are our future workforce and are learning the skills they need to be successful every day in the classroom," said Anne Kaiser, vice president of community and economic development for Georgia Power. "Supporting high quality public education starts with supporting the educators on the front lines and the grants are one way that we can show new teachers that their work is appreciated."

Georgia public colleges and universities that have schools of education submitted the final nominations. To be eligible for a grant, candidates must be in the top 25 percent of their class, be a first-year teacher employed by a public school in Georgia and demonstrate a high aptitude for teaching.

The recipients vary from pre-K to elementary, middle and high school teachers. Teachers are encouraged to use the funds to purchase school items such as books, educational CDs or DVDs, computers, projectors, or other supplies to enhance their classrooms and student's learning experience.

2017 New Teacher Assistant Grant recipients include:

Central Georgia

  • Zachary Ralph Griffin, Macon (Bibb County School District)
  • Meagan Kaylee Pittman, Perry (Houston County School District)

Coastal Georgia

  • Raven Davis, Savannah (Savannah-Chatham County Schools)
  • Donnie Jones, Savannah (Savannah-Chatham County Schools)
  • Nicole Williams Harris, Savannah (Savannah-Chatham County Schools)
  • Carly Elizabeth Chevalier, Metter (Candler County School District)
  • Sarah Herrin, Jesup (Wayne County School District)
  • Ashley Marie Galloway, Nahunta (Brantley County School District)
  • Kevin Judy, Swainsboro (Emanuel County Schools)

East Georgia

  • Tara Swinson, Augusta (Richmond County School District)
  • Keenan Jackson, Thomson (McDuffie County Schools)
  • Taylor Thompson, Evans (Columbia County School System)
  • John Goldberg, Evans (Columbia County School System)

Metro Atlanta

  • Maria L. Soto, Suwanee (Gwinnett County Public Schools)
  • Randal James Taylor, Suwanee (Gwinnett County Public Schools)
  • Esmeralda Trevino, Suwanee (Gwinnett County Public Schools)
  • Todd Schuggerow, Cumming (Forsyth County Schools)
  • Meria Carstarphen, Atlanta (Atlanta Public Schools)
  • Alexander Petch, Newnan (Coweta County Schools)
  • Jasmine Hill, Atlanta (Atlanta Public Schools)
  • Robert Brown, Jonesboro (Clayton County Public Schools)
  • Anslee Duff, Jonesboro (Clayton County Public Schools)
  • Michael Claudius, Jonesboro (Clayton County Public Schools)
  • David Handley, Douglas (Coffee County Schools)
  • Michael Benjamin, Conyers (Rockdale County Schools)
  • Chikima Brantley, McDonough (Henry County Schools)
  • Maci Shearouse, McDonough (Henry County Schools)
  • Darryl Baynes, Stone Mountain (DeKalb County School District)

Northeast Georgia

  • Chrishandra Coletha Perkins, Greensboro (Greene County School District)
  • J. Seth Warner, Winder (Barrow County School District)
  • Darby Smith Bozeman, Winder (Barrow County Schools)
  • Chelsea Freihaut, Athens (Clarke County School District)

Northwest Georgia

  • Daniel Merritt, Lafayette (Walker County School District)
  • Ernestina Gonzales, Chatsworth (Murray County School District)
  • Marla Williams, Carrollton (Carroll County)

South Region

  • Keidra Nicole Green, Cordele (Crisp County School District)
  • Joseph Wiggins, Thomasville (Thomas County School District)
  • Raylee Clack Etheridge, Leesburg (Lee County School District)
  • Chatabious Thomas, Albany (Dougherty County School District)
  • Kelly Gordon, Valdosta (Lowndes County Schools)

West Georgia

  • Shelby Merriweather, Columbus (Muscogee County School District)
  • Corey Reed, Barnesville (Lamar County School District)

Georgia Power has been a partner with the state's public education system for more than 100 years – from supporting the work of groups such as Junior Achievement, to providing new teacher assistance grants, to hosting students at the company's generation facilities, Georgia Power works to help students achieve their full potential. For more information about how the company is helping advance education and build the highly skilled workforce of tomorrow, visit www.georgiapower.com/education.    

About Georgia Power
Georgia Power is the largest electric subsidiary of Southern Company (NYSE: SO), America's premier energy company. Value, Reliability, Customer Service and Stewardship are the cornerstones of the company's promise to 2.5 million customers in all but four of Georgia's 159 counties. Committed to delivering clean, safe, reliable and affordable energy at rates below the national average, Georgia Power maintains a diverse, innovative generation mix that includes nuclear, coal and natural gas, as well as renewables such as solar, hydroelectric and wind. Georgia Power focuses on delivering world-class service to its customers every day and the company is consistently recognized by J.D. Power and Associates as an industry leader in customer satisfaction. For more information, visit www.GeorgiaPower.com and connect with the company on Facebook (Facebook.com/GeorgiaPower), Twitter (Twitter.com/GeorgiaPower) and Instagram (Instagram.com/ga_power).

Cision View original content with multimedia:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/georgia-power-names-2017-new-teacher-assistance-grant-recipients-300580856.html

SOURCE Georgia Power

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Read more: Georgia Power names 2017 New Teacher Assistance...

This report provides a comprehensive overview of the global OE automotive active and passive safety systems sector, major suppliers, top 14 markets, technology trends and market size forecasts.

Based on exclusive interviews, primary research and proprietary data this global safety market study includes:

  • Automotive OE active safety systems (adaptive cruise control, head-up displays, lane departure warning, parking assistance, brakes) and passive safety systems (front airbags, side airbags, driver airbags, passenger airbags, curtain airbags) fitment and market size data for the top 14 markets
  • A review of the latest technological developments and market trends of safety systems (including frontal airbags, side airbags, curtain airbags, seatbelts, active head restraints, adaptive cruise control, blind spot detection, lane departure, park assist, electronic braking, ABS, ESC, predictive braking, lighting systems, steer assist, radar, head-up display, cameras, adaptive front lighting, daytime running lights, run-flat tyres, TPMS)
  • Regional supplier market share data tables and commentary
  • Exclusive interviews with OE suppliers of safety technology including Takata, Bosch, TRW, Continental, Harman, Delphi
  • Updated profiles of the major automotive safety systems suppliers including their strategies and prospects for future safety developments
  • Sector PESTER (Political, Economic, Social, Technological, Environmental and Regulatory) analysis

Key Topics Covered:

Introduction

Pester analysis

Companies

  • Aisin Seiki Co., Ltd.
  • ASC Inc
  • Beijing Hainachuan Automotive Parts Co
  • Heuliez
  • Inteva Products, LLC
  • Magna International Inc.
  • Pininfarina
  • Valmet Automotive
  • Webasto AG

Forecasts

  • Conventional-sized sunroofs
  • Convertible roofs
  • Retractable hard-top roofs
  • Retractable soft-top roofs
  • Large sunroofs

Markets

  • Emerging markets
  • Market shares
  • Asia-Pacific
  • Europe
  • North America
  • Technologies

Other

  • Bonding system from Dow Automotive
  • Polycarbonate roof systems
  • Smart Fortwo foam roof
  • Webasto's Multi Optional Roof System
  • World's largest openable one-piece panorama roof
  • Retractable hard-top roofs
  • BMW Z4
  • Nissan Murano CrossCabriolet
  • Renault Wind
  • Retractable soft-top roofs
  • Chevrolet 2015 Corvette Z06
  • Ferrari California
  • Valmet Automotive's soft-top sound insulation roof system
  • Solar roofs
  • Solar sliding roof from Webasto
  • Toyota Prius solar roof
  • Webasto's solar roof
  • Archive
  • Ferrari Superamerica
  • Nissan 370Z Roadster
  • Solar roofs from Quantum Fuel Systems Technologies Worldwide

For more information about this report visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/sq24xg/global_light?w=5

Media Contact:

Laura Wood, Senior Manager
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Cision View original content:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/global-light-vehicle-safety-systems-market-2018-2032-adaptive-cruise-control-head-up-displays-lane-departure-warning-parking-assistance--brakes-300580657.html

SOURCE Research and Markets

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Read more: Global Light Vehicle Safety Systems Market...

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